The Peacock House

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PeacockHouse.jpg

The Peacock House, in Holland Park London was designed for department store owner Ernest Ridley Debenham. It is a Grade I listed Detached House designed in Arts & Crafts style by the architect Halsey Ricardo. It became known as Debenham House after it was sold on Sir Ernest's death and has subsequently featured as a location for a long list of TV and movie productions.

Background[edit]

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The interior contains tiles designed by William de Morgan, a mosaic dome painted by Gaetano Meo and ceilings painted by Ernest Gimson.

Poirot & Other Media Coverage[edit]

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The Peacock House has been used as a location in a large number of TV programmes and movies including the Poirot episode Season 7, Episode 2 'Lord Edgware Dies' from 2000, where is is used to represent Lord Edgeware's London home. It was also in Season 10, Episode 2 'Cards On The Table' where the enigmatic, sinister Mr. Shaitana, one of London's richest men, invites 8 guests, 4 of them possible murderers and 4 'detectives' to his opulent home, represented by The Peacock House. The interiors also featured prominently in Iain Softley's The Wings of the Dove (1997 film).

The exterior of the house was used in the film 'Secret Ceremony', directed by Joseph Losey. Elizabeth Taylor's character Leonora resided at the house in the film. The Peacock House has also featured in the television series 'What the Butler Saw' and 'Spooks'.

See Also In Chimni[edit]

ChimniWiki Is My House 'Art Deco'?

Chimni Wiki Homes Used In Poirot Episodes

Chimni Wiki Page: Homes Used As TV & Movie Locations

Other Interesting Sites[edit]

IMDB - 'Lord Edgware Dies' http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0235681/?ref_=fn_al_tt_2

TV Locations - http://www.tvlocations.net/lordedgware.htm

IMDB - 'Cards On The Table' http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0478226/?ref_=fn_al_tt_7

Books We Liked[edit]

Stourton, James (2012). Great Houses of London (Hardback). London: Frances Lincoln. ISBN 978-0-7112-3366-9.


References[edit]

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